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Agriculture –for-Adequate Housing Project
National Organization for Hybrid Rehousing (NOHR)
June 2018
Project Proposal
Table of Contents
List of Acronyms1
Project Proposal2
General Information2
Project Description3
Background3
Justification3
Legal and Policy Context4
Objectives5
Implementation Methods6
Stakeholder Participation Plan7
Annexes8
Annex (1) Description of the project proposal team8
Annex (2) Logical Framework9
Annex (3) Summary of key stakeholders with Interest/Influence matrix 12
Annex (5) Problem Tree13
Annex (5) Objective Tree14
References15
List of Acronyms
CVA Comprehensive Vulnerability Assessment
HIP Humanitarian Implementation Plan
ILO International Labour Organization
INGO International Non-Governmental Organization
JIF Jordan INGO Forum
JRP Jordan Response Plan
JRPSC Jordan Response Platform for the Syria Crisis
NOHR National Organization for Hybrid Rehousing
NRC the Norwegian Refugee Council 
OHCHR Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights
RRP6 Syria Regional Response Plan
UN United Nations
UNHCR United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
VAF Vulnerability Assessment Framework
PROJECT PROPOSAL:
National Organization for Hybrid Rehousing (NOHR)
June 2018
General Information
Project summary
This project idea is an inspiration of the fact that Syrian refugees are facing a humanitarian problem in Jordan regarding adequate housing and its affordability. Many Jordanian citizens own private farmhouses away from their home residence as real estate or investments, which are rarely visited and taken care of by foreign labors (Madanat, 2010). Accordingly, the project targets farms distributed in the northern of Jordan, owned by Jordanian citizens who are willing to benefit agriculturally from their land by offering a free accommodation to a Syrian family that is responsible for planting and harvesting the land. While providing the farmhouse with the necessary renovations to reach the minimum Sphere standards of adequate housing by local contractors and labors using local materials to refresh the local market. This interaction will provide sustainable solutions to the main housing issue of lack of affordable adequate housing for vulnerable Syrian refugees while benefiting the host community; this will conserve the positive social cohesion between both groups. Finally, we tend through our projects to improve the financial status of the targeted groups to enable them to enhance and participate in developmental roles instead of being a burden to their place of residence. The implementation of this project needs to be aligned on three levels; a wide study plan based on research and statistics, coordination between government, private sectors and NGOs, and providing multi-dimensional capacity building to finally achieve stability and integration.

Project title
Providing adequate housing for refugee families through exchanging with local farm-owners, their agricultural work for private farmhouses to live in the North of Jordan (Irbid, Jarash and Ajloun).
Location
North of Jordan (Irbid, Jarash and Ajloun)
Duration
The duration of this project is 2 Years, from (1 May 2019) through (30 April 2021).

Proposing organization
National Organization for Hybrid Rehousing (NOHR)
NOHR is a national non-governmental organization specialized in providing shelter for vulnerable people and multi-dimensional capacity building at the individual level, the organizational level and the relational and institutional level.
Address of proposing organization
Rainbow St., 1st Circle, Jabal Amman, Amman, Jordan
Name and address of primary contact
PM. Hazem El Khalili, [email protected] organization and partners
Partners: Ministry of Municipals and Rural Affairs, Ministry of Agriculture, Agriculture Credit Corporation, Ministry of Labour, and UNHCR.

Project Description
Background
Seven years since the Syrian crisis has occurred, millions of Syrian fled to many regions around the world while the majority moved to neighboring countries. Jordan is considered one of the most affected countries by the Syrian crisis. UNHCR (2018) assured that more than six hundred sixty thousand Syrian refugees are officially registered where nearly eighty percent amongst them live outside the camps. However, this report will state a humanitarian problem that has been highlighted by NRC (2015) specifically in the north of Jordan, which concerned with the shortage of an affordable adequate housing for refugees outside camps in Jordan on international and governmental levels, for refugees and Jordanian citizens as a host community themselves (p.4-6). OHCHR (2009) indicated that, “Adequate housing was recognized as part of the right to an adequate standard of living in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights and in the 1966 International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights” (p.1) and it has been defined as “the right to live somewhere in security, peace and dignity” (p.3) while OHCHR (2009) pointed out that, affordability is one main condition of housing to be considered adequate (p.4).To provide a home place to live is one of the main priorities when it comes to the humanitarian response and considered a human right yet it is sometimes forgotten when the essential needs like food and education arouse. In refugee camps, housing is the first intervention, and usually starts with tents to become later re-fabricated homes. The UNHCR has established shelters for Syrians in the camps in Jordan, but what happens when refugees settle outside the camps -as it is the case with most of the Syrians in Jordan- and then they cannot find any affordable and decent accommodation? In addition to that when the host community gives off signals that giving better housing for urban refugees is politically unacceptable.

Justification
At the outset one major source of this issue is the high rental prices for houses in Jordan which can be referred to the wide gap between demand and supply in the housing sector due to the large waves of refugees in the last few decades, Syrians in particular as they shape the largest rate. NRC (2015) reported that, rental prices have witnessed fourteen percent increasing in the period between 2013 and 2015 while the average payment for rents by refugees is 150 Jordanian Dinar on a monthly basis (p.14). “This challenging situation has forced many to resort to coping strategies such as sharing living quarters, borrowing money to cover rental expenditure, and improvising makeshift shelters with limited access to basic services. Anecdotal evidence suggests that issues surrounding housing access and availability have resulted in deteriorating social relations between Jordanian and Syrian groups”(REACH, 2014, p.2). Goyes, Tolgay and Vidal (2016) stated that “As refugees in the region have limited opportunities for legal employment, they often have to face difficult economic situation between paying for essential goods and services (food, health, education, etc.) and paying rent. In Jordan, rent is one of the largest household expenditures for Syrian refugees” (P.4)
The tenure security challenge is a cause to our targeted problem, “Many Syrian families lack security of tenure and are still relying on a verbal renting contract, which puts them at risk of eviction, harassment or exploitation” (JIF, 2018, p.7). NRC (2015) reported that, this crucially affecting the ability to maintain their legal status where they required updating their place of residence on government issued service cards to access local services whilst moving frequently to secure affordable accommodation. “In 2017, CARE found that 10.3 per cent of assessed families reported moving because they had been evicted or could no longer afford rent, and more than half did not know how long they could stay in their current accommodation”.(JIF, 2018, p.7).

Another main trigger is the low average income for Syrian refugees. The lack of work permits is one reason, as one to five amongst those who are allowed to work based on their ages have these permits. As a result of jobs unavailability, unbearable fees and the fear of losing assistance (CARE, 2017, p4). On the other hand, in the female-headed household families -that are almost twenty nine percent of the Syrian refugees families in Jordan- with low income raises the possibilities to the dependency on child labors (CARE, 2017, p.3). Nevertheless, CARE (2017) stated that, about ninety percent of the targeted families in their study were in debt (p.5). This leads to resorting into illegal jobs, “informal sector workers are often subject to exploitation, including working long hours, denial of leave or pay and low wages” (Barbelet & Wake, 2017, p.5).
A rental support grant is one such tool to assist refugees by addressing immediate housing needs. In Jordan, UNHCR is coordinating Cash-for-Rent programs to vulnerable refugee households in urban areas that can add pressure to constricted housing markets especially in the Northern parts of Jordan such as Irbid, Jerash and Ajloun (Goyes, Tolgay & Vidal, 2016, p.1). While we have to shift our efforts to identifying the main roots and effects for the lack of affordable housing in Jordan regarding refugees and citizens in which it would be an effective tool to set accurate methodological objectives in order to achieve applicable and successful best practices on the long term. Taking into account unifying the efforts between all the related actors in adopting a comprehensive approach for the right of adequate affordable housing either for refugees or for the host community. In addition to guaranteeing the stability of positive social cohesion between both groups.

Legal and policy context
The project approach is in line with the recommendations from the Syria Crisis Regional Response Plan (RRP6), the ECHO Humanitarian Implementation Plan (HIP) 2014 and the Jordan Response Plan for Syria Crisis (JRP) 2018. Our aim is to juxtapose our project’s objectives with the international, regional and Jordanian Government approaches and visions in regarding to our targeted problem. The Jordanian Government showed a great orientation in the last few years towards the objectives we aim to achieve through the Jordan Response Plan (JRP) for Syria Crisis. Since the Jordan Compact -The Jordan Compact was agreed in February 2016 and establishes that the Government of Jordan would create 200,000 job opportunities for Syrian refugees and facilitate business development processes for Syrian refugees over the following 3 years, conditional upon increased financial support from the international community- JRPSC (2018) pointed out that “a number of policy shifts were made by the Government to create a conducive environment to achieve the objectives of the Compact. This includes allowing Syrians in the camps to access jobs in host communities, providing pathways for refugees working in the construction and agricultural sector to obtain work permits without being sponsored, and the extension of a grace period until the end of 2017 for work permit fees”(p.77).

On the other hand, JRPSC (2018) stated that “the Shelter Sector aims at improving access to affordable and adequate housing for the most vulnerable among Syrian refugees and Jordanian communities, through a range of interventions addressing specific vulnerabilities at household level while maintaining positive impact on the housing market. Bringing additional and affordable housing units onto the market is likely to relieve upward pressure on rental prices, and tenants have more options for better quality housing at better prices. Moreover, this will likely reduce opportunities for exploitation within Syrian refugees and vulnerable Jordanians, and mitigate the use of negative coping mechanisms among them” (p.85). JRPSC (2018) added, “Response Plan Based on the CVA, the sector response is designed to improve access to affordable and adequate housing along with tenure security. Complementing the response plans developed for earlier years, the response strategy for the years 2018-2020 will focus mostly on bolstering resilience programs addressing identified shelter needs. It is important to highlight that all projects specifically focusing on Syrian refugee in host communities have a clear multiplier effect on Jordanian markets and direct benefits Jordanian landlords”(p.85).

Objectives
Our Main Objective
In a two years duration and by the end of the year 2021, one hundred Syrian refugee families -with the average of almost five individuals in each- who live outside camps in the northern cities of Jordan (Irbid, Jarash and Ajloun) will have access to affordable adequate housing in Agriculture work-for-Adequate housing project while proper renovations to the farmhouses will take place in order to meet the adequate housing standards
Project’s Sub-Objectives
One of the project aims is to decrease the pressure on housing demands and to minimize the wide gap between the demand and supply in the housing sector.
Another aim is to decrease the resorting into illegal jobs by offering agricultural jobs in a return of adequate housing while also decrease the lack of secure tenure.
To assure by the end of the project execution that; the host community in particular the Jordanian farmhouses owners will benefit agriculturally from their land that have been taken care of by the Syrian families while they offer their farmhouses for the Syrian refugees families to live in ,which will enhance the positive social cohesion between both groups; the Syrian refugees from one hand and the host community from the other.
Implementation Methods
The progress of Agriculture for adequate housing project will be on different levels. A set of activities to be held by NOHR on the preliminary level of the project’s implementation in corporation with different Stakeholders, as follow:
Farm Owners selection; the selection of the farm owners is based on criteria set by NOHR research and analysis team. Data will be collected based on the farmhouse standards, proper location, farm utilities (water, electricity and sanitation) and the reasons of farm owner’s interest in the project, in cooperation with Ministry of Municipals and Rural Affairs.

Beneficiary selection; NOHR’s vulnerability criteria are based on Vulnerability Assessment Framework (VAF) that has been finalized by the Inter-Sector Working Group including UNHCR. The vulnerability criteria for beneficiary selection includes prioritizing families who are homeless, living in overcrowded and substandard accommodation, or facing imminent eviction due to an inability to pay arrears and rents. Other priority families are female-headed households, families of more than ten members, and/or families with disabled or severely ill family members. Beneficiaries are finally selected following a home visit by our team. The beneficiary assessments are completed using a mobile phone application and the project’s website, with the data later downloaded to a database. Our teams work for lists of refugees, through word-of-mouth and through organizational center visits and apply.

Gender approach: the beneficiaries’ selection prioritize the female-headed households, and after the selection occur awareness sessions and capacity building on field training will be held; practical strategies and methods of farming, in cooperation with experts from the Ministry of Agriculture. Then, arranging awareness sessions for them about their right of secure tenure with the presence of legal experts and NOHR’s support team while at the end organizing women empowerment sessions to enhance, strengthen their capabilities and understanding their roles and how they can benefit from the project.

Capacity Building Approach: first, arrange awareness sessions and capacity building on field training; practical strategies and methods of farming, in cooperation with experts from the Ministry of Agriculture. Then, coordinate awareness sessions for beneficiaries about their right of secure tenure with the presence of legal experts and NOHR’s support team. Finally, organizing meetings between the Jordanian farm owners and Agricultural Credit Corporation to understand their agricultural loans policies in the presence of NOHR’s representatives.

Participatory Approach: at the beginning, regular meetings will be set out by NOHR’s representatives and the farm owners to understand their conditions and point of views which will engage them in the decision making process. Then, organizing regular meetings between Landlords and the beneficiaries to exchange their point of views, conditions and area of interests with the presence of legal experts and NOHR’s representatives. At the end, engaging the beneficiaries who are experienced in agriculture in training the others.

Benefiting Local Community: the later implementation level of renovation and expanding the farmhouses will depend only on local resources; Local contractors, labors and materials to benefit the local market.

Stakeholder Participation Plan
A project is a successful when it achieves its objectives and meets or exceeds the expectations of the stakeholders. The NOHR has key stakeholders such as Ministry of Municipals and Rural Affairs, Ministry of Agriculture, Agriculture Credit Corporation, Ministry of Labour, Syrian Refugees Homeless Group and UNHCR. Each one has its own objectives and contribution to the project. These local and international stakeholders also play a great role in providing services for the Syrian Refugees since the beginning of the crisis. In addition, they will be involved and engaged in the project through actions, decisions and communication to assure that the necessary services and aid have reached the right vulnerable groups in need. Each one of the stakeholders is in direct connection to the issue and has a great influence on the project success. In brief, the interests of the stakeholders are; the Ministry of Municipals and Rural Affairs’ is to benefit the Jordanian community especially in rural areas, the UNHCR is to ensure it focuses on achieving effective assistance to the refugees, Ministry of Agriculture is to raise awareness and build capacity among famers and farm owners. Finally, the NOHR will maintain the workflow of the project alongside to the communication and relation to the stakeholders.
Annexes
Annex (1)
Description of the project proposal team
Our team in this project consists of five main members each of specialized in different field in order to achieve our goals when the project ends as follow:
Project manager: Hazem El KhaliliTeams:
Designing and Execution team
Leader: Hazem El KhaliliRole: Leading a team of designers, architects, engineers and specialized individuals to properly execute and supervise the renovation and the building process, and to make sure it is all complied with the project designed proposal and the building legislations and laws.

Research and Analysis team
Leader: Safa’a Al HmoudRole: Collecting the necessary data and analyze the current situation for each targeted individual in the project.

Planning team
Leader: Ayham Al FadelRole: A team which responsible for proposing the planning strategies for each program and project, and assure that all the analyzed problem is met in the objectives of each project.

Communication and Documentation Team
Leader: Bayan RahhalRole: A team who is responsible for making partnerships with all Stakeholders (Government, Private Sectors, NGOS and the Targeted Group Participants) regarding the project progress and goals to be met properly. While respecting all the communication protocols and documenting the progress of the project at all levels.

Evaluation, Monitoring and Support Team
Leader: Obada SnobarRole: A team who is responsible for evaluating the progress of the project from the start to the end and monitoring the results and its effects. Project support staff control the contract and payment process.

Annex (2) Logical framework matrix
Logical Framework for Agriculture-for-Adequate Housing Project
Objectives Indicators Means of Verification Assumptions
Goal Project Goal:
Providing affordable adequate housing for refugees out of camps in the North of Jordan A1.1: Full cooperation from related certain Governmental Sector or International Organizations
A1.2: The Beneficiary families will not leave Jordan for a long period to go back to Syria or move to another country
Decrease Rental Prices
Outcome(s) Outcome 1:
Decrease Rental Prices I1.1: 10% Increasing each month in the numbers of farm owners offering their farmhouses for free in exchange for Agriculturally benefiting from their land
I1.2: 10% Increasing each month in Increase the numbers of Syrian Refugee Families interested in Agricultural work instead of paying rents in exchange for free farmhouse unit Monthly Statistics Reports Issued by NOHR Research and Analysis Team based on the Number of Applications Increasing each Month
A1.1: Full cooperation and acceptance from the Housing Sector in Jordan and Housing owners
A1.2: The Full Acceptance from the Private Farm Owners of the Idea of another Family Living in their Farm Houses in Exchange for Benefiting Agriculturally
Output(s) Output 1.1
Reduce the Gap between Demand & Supply on Housing Bringing 10 new farmhouses onto the market each month to be ready for renovations, extensions and services to meet the minimum Sphere standards of Adequate Housing Monthly Statistics Reports Issued by NOHR Research and Analysis Team based on the Number of Applications and Registered farms for the project Increasing each Month The Syrian crisis will come to an end and the waves of refugees will decrease
Activities Activities (for Output 1.1)
1.1.1: Establish a website and mobile application for applying to the project with the specific criteria form of application & do the necessary marketing to ease reaching the targeted groups
1.1.2: Organize 5 meetings with Landlords who is interesting in the project and interviewing them to understand their conditions and point of views
1.1.3: Organize 3 Site Visits to each farmhouse accepted for the project to analyze their situation
1.1.4: Organize 3 Visits to each beneficiary families to assure that they meet the standards Inputs/Resources
1.1.1: IT professionals, marketing professionals Form of application with specific criteria
1.1.2: Meeting spots in each City, Space to hold meetings, NOHR team representatives, Survey Form, Documentation references
1.1.3: Vehicle, Camera, team of experts
1.1.4: Vehicle, Survey Form, Documentation references
Costs & Sources
No conflicts occur in the appointment schedule
Increase Average Income for Syrian Refugees
Outcome(s) Outcome 2:
Increase Average Income for Syrian Refugees 15% increasing of income by agreeing with Landlords on a share of 10% of Farm Profits Annual Statistics Report Issued by NOHR Evaluation, Monitoring and Support Team
UNHCR will not cut off support aids
Output(s) Output 2.1
Providing more Job Opportunities for Syrian Refugees in Host Community
Output 2.2
Provide more Job Opportunities for Syrian Refugees Families that are Women-Headed Household I2.1: The level of Agricultural knowledge and experiences raised, and enhanced their commitment to farming works by 50%
I2.2: The level of Agricultural knowledge and experiences raised, and enhanced their commitment to farming works by 50% V2.1: Monthly progress study testing their level of knowledge & Organize follow up and inspections protocols to assure their level of commitment
V2.2: Monthly progress study testing their level of knowledge & Organize follow up and inspections protocols to assure their level of commitment Full corporation from Ministry of Labors on issuing work permits
Activities Activities (for Output 2.1)
2.1.1: Organizing 5 awareness sessions in cooperation with experts from the Ministry of Agriculture
2.1.2: Organizing 10 capacity building on field training: Practical strategies and methods of farming in cooperation with experts from the Ministry of Agriculture
Activities (for Output 2.2)
2.2.1: Organizing 5 awareness sessions in cooperation with experts fromm the Ministry of Agriculture
2.2.2: Organizing 10 capacity building on field training: Practical strategies and methods of farming in cooperation with experts from the Ministry of Agriculture
2.2.3: Arranging 5 women empowerment sessions to enhance and strengthen their capabilities, understanding their roles in the community and how they can benefit from the project Inputs/Resources
2.1.1: Farming Experts, awareness-raising materials, space to hold sessions
2.1.2: Farming Experts, Farming tools and equipment, Safety tools, farms to hold workshops, suitable uniforms
2.2.1: Farming Experts, awareness-raising materials, space to hold sessions
2.2.2: Farming Experts, Farming tools and equipment, Safety tools, farms to hold workshops, suitable uniforms
2.2.3: Space to hold sessions, women empowerment experts, computer, data show, procures
Costs & Sources
Full attendance and attention to the sessions and the capacity building training
Assure Secured Tenure for Syrian Refugees outside Camps
Outcome(s) Outcome 3:
Assure Secured Tenure for Syrian Refugees outside Camps 100% of Tenure contracts will be signed with all the conditions included by the end of the project Annual Statistics Report Issued by NOHR Evaluation, Monitoring and Support Team (Legal experts) No legal conflicts occur
Output(s) Output 3.1:
Benefiting Landlords to decrease Exploitation of Syrian Refugee Families
Output 3.2:
Establishing positive social cohesion between the Syrian refugees and host community and decrease the tension 3.1: 50% -60% increase in satisfactory with the acceptance of their conditions annually
3.2: 40% of success in relationship between both sides 3.1: Annual survey, study , interviews and follow up held by NOHR Evaluation, Monitoring and Support Team
3.2: Annual survey, study , interviews and follow up held by NOHR Evaluation, Monitoring and Support Team No tension occur between both sides
Activities Activities (for Output 3.1)
3.1.1: Organize 5 meetings with Landlords who is interesting in the project and interviewing them to understand their conditions and point of views
Activities (for Output 3.2)
3.2.1: Organizing 5 awareness sessions for beneficiaries about their right of secure tenure
3.2.2: Organize 10 regular meetings between Landlords and the beneficiaries
Inputs/Resources
3.1.1: Meeting spots in each City, Space to hold meetings, NOHR team representatives, Survey Form, Documentation references
3.2.1: Legal Experts, awareness-raising materials, space to hold sessions
3.2.2: Legal Experts, material for each sides conditions and rights, space to hold sessions, NOHR team representatives. Costs & Sources
Full attendance and attention to the sessions and meetings and acceptance from both sides
Annex (3): Summary of key stakeholders with Interest/Influence matrix
Ministry of Municipals & Rural Affairs Ministry of Agriculture Agricultural Credit Corporation Ministry of Labor Syrian Refugees Benefiting group Farm owners UNHCR
Relation to the Problem High pressure on the urban areas Capacity building for farmers and beneficiaries in the sector Responsible for giving loans to the Jordanian Farm owners Responsible for Issuing work permits. High pressure on employment requests Lack of affordable housing and job opportunities In a need for those who take care for their lands and benefiting agriculturally Directly concerned with the protection of refugees
Interest Benefit the Jordanian community especially in rural areas Raise awareness and build capacity among beneficiaries and farm owners Reviving farm lands Improving the working conditions of Syrian refugees, reduce the pressure on employment requests In a need for housing and job opportunities Securing and caring for their lands To ensure it focuses on achieving effective assistance; by building mutual capacity for ongoing effectiveness & sustainability
Potential Giving contact information and locations of farm owners who can be a good target for our project Capacity building training to the project’s beneficiaries through their experts and raise the awareness about agriculture techniques Give agriculture loans to revive lands to Jordanian farm owners Providing facilities for issuing work permits and ease the process, Expand the limits of the job permits to create more job opportunities Know their needs to participate in our project, (the individuals with agriculture background to participate in providing training to the others) Know their requirements, conditions and their needs to participate in our project Provides an important forum for NOHR and states to network, dialogue and exchange views
Interaction Through regular early meetings Through regular training sessions to beneficiaries Through regular meetings with farm owners and NOHR representatives Through meetings so they get more information about the project and provide support Through weekly meetings between the Agriculture experts and the Syrian’s trainers Through regular meetings Through UNHCR branch structures
Other Actions Work with Government institutions which have extra information about other regions and farmhouse owners National Agriculture Information System (NAIS) Generally good relation Cooperation with ILO in a project “decent jobs for Jordanians and Syrian refugees in the manufacturing sector” Good relation with other NGOs Work with Agricultural Credit Corporation to get loans Partnership together with NRC for shelter projects in Jordan, and the Global Cluster for Shelter
NOHR Actions No ongoing projects.

Good relation with Research and analysis team of NOHR No ongoing projects No ongoing projects Good regular relation in all legal transactions Good relation with UNHCR and planning team of NOHR No ongoing projects NOHR partnership with UNHCR to exchange necessary information
Annex (5)
(Figure 1) Indicates the main problem stated previously with its causes and effects using the problem tree method.

2562225262255Psychological Problems
00Psychological Problems

619887094234000492442527489150049244252749550005382260243840Child Labor
00Child Labor
610362094170500
515366014922500438150133985002051685133985001410335224790Exploitation, Long Working Hours and denial of Leaves
00Exploitation, Long Working Hours and denial of Leaves
3141345-127000438150134620003502025224790Slums/ Illegal settlements
00Slums/ Illegal settlements

9906078105Lack of Social Cohesion between Refugees & Host Community
00Lack of Social Cohesion between Refugees & Host Community
411480037020500
2051685347345004874260126365Lack of feeling Safe, Affiliation & Stability
00Lack of feeling Safe, Affiliation & Stability
3502025126365Homelessness, Forced Eviction & Displacement
00Homelessness, Forced Eviction & Displacement

31413454826000554101045656500515620455930001410335154305Illegal Working
00Illegal Working
411416545593000205232045593000
99060374015Crimes Increase
00Crimes Increase
4319270374015More Syrian in Debt
00More Syrian in Debt
2183765374015Mendacity Increases
00Mendacity Increases
42665651924050042665651936750051562019304000179006519304000
476631019177000118046519177000296481519177000986155456565Shortage of affordable adequate housing for refugees out of camps in Jordan
00Shortage of affordable adequate housing for refugees out of camps in Jordan

1180465889000476631088900029648159525002964815178625500990601891030Huge Waves of Refugees
00Huge Waves of Refugees
7924802536190001595120253619000792480253619000990602671445Fear of Losing Assistance
00Fear of Losing Assistance
296481556959500792480569595002183765274320Low Average Income
00Low Average Income
99060274320High Rental Prices
00High Rental Prices
4404360274320Lack of Secured Tenure
00Lack of Secured Tenure
22713958826501/5 of Refugees at Working Age Don’t Have Working Permit
001/5 of Refugees at Working Age Don’t Have Working Permit
99060882650Wide Gap between Demand & Supply on Housing
00Wide Gap between Demand & Supply on Housing

528193024447500528193087630005416550400685Landlords Exploitation of Syrian Refugee Families
00Landlords Exploitation of Syrian Refugee Families
595058524447500296481524892000434213024892000380809540513029.5% of Syrian Refugees Families are Women-Headed Household
0029.5% of Syrian Refugees Families are Women-Headed Household

79248014605000
4984750149654001180465283845High Permits Fees
00High Permits Fees
2271395283845No Available Jobs
00No Available Jobs
4114800300355Employers Refused to Pay Associated Fees
00Employers Refused to Pay Associated Fees

2714625298450Minimizing Psychological Problems
00Minimizing Psychological Problems
(Figure 2) Indicates the main objectives using the objective tree method.

5905502870200055441856350Reduce Child Labor
00Reduce Child Labor
5250815297180003385820377825Reduce Slums/ Illegal settlements
00Reduce Slums/ Illegal settlements
1562735377825Reduce Exploitation, Long Working Hours and denial of Leaves
00Reduce Exploitation, Long Working Hours and denial of Leaves

6265545226695006360795227330004267200374015003385820446405Reduce Homelessness, Forced Eviction & Displacement
00Reduce Homelessness, Forced Eviction & Displacement

329438035433000
426720036830000
508635012382500508635012446000
5763895398145002466340102870Increase Average Income
00Increase Average Income
251460102870Provide Affordable Rental Prices
00Provide Affordable Rental Prices
2204085-2124075003293745-319087500590550-3054985005026660-2345055Feeling Safe, Affiliation & Stability
00Feeling Safe, Affiliation & Stability
5693410-1624965004418965-1411605004418965-141033500251460-2783205Positive Social Cohesion between Refugees & Host Community
00Positive Social Cohesion between Refugees & Host Community
668020-162560000668020-1410970001942465-1410970001562735-1927225Legal Working
00Legal Working
2204720-1625600004471670-1229995Less Syrian in Debt
00Less Syrian in Debt
4918710-93472000251460-1229995Crimes Decrease
00Crimes Decrease
1332865-934720002336165-1229995Mendacity Decreases
00Mendacity Decreases
3117215-934720004918710-162560003117215-1619250042672002516505Employers to Pay Associated Fees
00Employers to Pay Associated Fees
174752023647400094488023647400094488023647400024237952499995Available Jobs
00Available Jobs
31172151614805003117215398145002423795711200Offer work permit for refugees who are at the age of work
00Offer work permit for refugees who are at the age of work
944880140716000944880398145001332865-162560004556760102870Assure Secured Tenure
00Assure Secured Tenure
1138555-669925Providing affordable adequate housing for refugees out of camps in Jordan
00Providing affordable adequate housing for refugees out of camps in Jordan
2204085-305562000
5255895233680Benefiting Landlords to decrease Exploitation of Syrian Refugee Families
00Benefiting Landlords to decrease Exploitation of Syrian Refugee Families
3998595233680Provide more Job Opportunities for Syrian Refugees Families who are Women-Headed Household
00Provide more Job Opportunities for Syrian Refugees Families who are Women-Headed Household
3117215774700045326307747000251460233680Reduce the Gap between Demand & Supply on Housing
00Reduce the Gap between Demand & Supply on Housing

251460287655Reduce the Waves of Refugees
00Reduce the Waves of Refugees

513715045466000
251460113030Reduce Fear of Losing Assistance
00Reduce Fear of Losing Assistance
1332865113030Reduce Permit Fees
00Reduce Permit Fees

References
Barbelet, V., & Wake, C. (2017, February). The lives and livelihoods of Syrian refugees, Summary Report. Retrieved April 16, 2018, from https://www.odi.org/publications/10736-lives-and-livelihoods-syrian-refugeesCARE. (2017, June 20). 7 Years Into Exile: How urban Syrian refugees, vulnerable Jordanians and other refugees in Jordan are being impacted by the Syria crisis. Retrieved April 16, 2018, from https://reliefweb.int/report/jordan/7-years-exile-how-urban-syrian-refugees-vulnerable-jordanians-and-other-refugeesGoyes, F., Tolgay, S., & Vidal, V. (2016, June). Refugees, Incremental Housing, And Shelter in the 21st Century. Retrieved May 14, 2018, from http://web.mit.edu/incrementalhousing/articlesPhotographs/pdfs/refugeesincrement.pdfJIF. (2018, January 21). Syrian refugees in Jordan: A protection overview. Retrieved April 16, 2018, from https://reliefweb.int/report/jordan/syrian-refugees-jordan-protection-overview-january-2018JRPSC. (2018). Jordan Response Plan for the Syria Crisis 2018-2020. Retrieved May 12, 2018, from https://static1.squarespace.com/static/522c2552e4b0d3c39ccd1e00/t/5ab3565f8a922d5e4a011286/1521702505515Madanat, H. (2010). Land Tenure in Jordan. Land Tenure Journal, 1(1). Retrieved April 16, 2018, from http://www.fao.org/nr/tenure/land-tenure-journal/index.php/LTJ/article/view/12/45NRC. (2015, June 15). In search of a home, Access to adequate housing in Jordan. Retrieved April 14, 2018, from https://www.nrc.no/resources/reports/in-search-of-a-home/OHCHR. (2009, November). Fact Sheet No. 21, The Human Right to Adequate Housing. Retrieved April 14, 2018, from http://www.refworld.org/docid/479477400.htmlREACH. (2014, June). Housing and Tensions in Jordanian Communities Hosting Syrian Refugees, Thematic Assessment Report. Retrieved May 11, 2018, from https://reliefweb.int/report/jordan/housing-and-tensions-jordanian-communities-hosting-syrian-refugees-thematic-assessmentUNHCR. (2018, March 31). UNHCR Jordan External Statistical Report on UNHCR Registered Syrians. Retrieved April 14, 2018, from https://data2.unhcr.org/en/documents/details/63054

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